Shooting Aerials for the McMullen Group.

This shoot was a challenge as the site sits inside the control zone and right under the flight path for Melbourne Airport.   The weather was perfect and we got lucky, thanks Melbourne Tower!  Getting a nice view of Melbourne from this far out is rare usually because of the smog and haze. 

A nice and clear view of Melbourne

A nice and clear view of Melbourne

Aerial Photography Tips 01. Shooting from a Cessna 172.

I have been shooting aerial photography in Melbourne and Australia from a Cessna 172 with great success for many years.  People have said to me that you can't get the same results from a fixed wing as you can from a helicopter, but I disagree.   Although in some scenarios a helicopter is the only option, the Cessna will do the job on most shoots.  I have spent so much time flying in these little airplanes I just love them, they are so reliable and easy to fly even I have landed one a few times, under instruction of course.  

When Airborne.

So, what I am going to do now is explain a few things that make your aerial photography flight a success and get the shots you need to get.   The first thing I always do is to set up my camera gear, I usually place my camera bag on the rear seat behind the passenger seat.   I have a camera bag backpack, a Crumpler to be exact that I can leave open by lifting the back up.  I can then leave my cameras and lens within arms reach for easy access.  If it is a short flight I sometimes leave my gear on the floor in the rear of the plane between me and the pilot.  This way I can reach down and grab my camera when needed.  Of course, whenever you are shooting with the window open you should always use a camera strap!  I have tried lots of camera straps but find most of them so bulky and too long.   There is enough going on once airborne and being tangled up with camera straps is not what you need.  I have a dog that I train with a whistle, unfortunately the whistle no longer has a lanyard as I use this as a camera strap while in the air.  It is strong enough and all you need to secure the camera, just don’t tell all those camera strap folks.  The only place I don’t use this type of lanyard is when in a helicopter as the door is off for the whole flight and you want the camera to be very secure.  I will talk some more about pre-flight preparation and working in control zones in my next post. 

What does 6000 feet over the Australian Open look like?

Looking back on some of my summer shoots and wishing the sky was this clear again.  This one was for the Australian Open in Melbourne.   We fly up to 6000 feet to shoot this aerial.  Hanging out of the aircraft is the fun part at that height. !

 

Melbourne and Olympic Parks 2017

Melbourne and Olympic Parks 2017

Brett Price Photography

A desire to capture stunning imagery for industries and businesses around the nation is how Brett Price came to be. Advancing his technologies alongside the growth of drone technology – his aim is to consistently provide top of the line technology and services to our customers.  Brett Price Photography isn’t just about servicing customers – it’s something that he loves to do. There’s an indescribable excitement that I always feel right before every project; being on the runway, checking my gear, and getting myself prepared for the best possible outcome right before take off. It’s exhilarating to know that every moment you capture won’t be identical to the last, even if it’s in the exact same location.  I also love the challenge of complex briefs, and knowing that you are an important part in helping somebody else tell their story. Although it can be difficult navigating into an area to get the best angle – the buzz of seeing a successful shot is one of the best feelings.  If you want to understand more about what I can do for your business, get in contact with me now. If you just want to see more of my work and what I get to experience everyday – follow me on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter!